Sarah Maxwell explains how to exercise when you’re dealing with hot flushes

Exercising during menopause can be challenging in many ways. If hot flushes are a familiar part of your journey, you’re not alone. Many women know all too well that menopause flushes can swoop in unexpectedly, catching you off guard at the most inconvenient times.
Other common symptoms of menopause include joint pain, muscle aches, and stiffness, which can make exercise more challenging but they are also often improved with regular physical activity.

Definition of a hot flush: 
A sudden and intense feeling of heat that spreads across the body, often accompanied by sweating and flushing. A rapid heartbeat and a sense of anxiety can also accompany it.
If you are experiencing these symptoms, regularly exercising might not be your top priority. Let’s explore how you can feel more confident about this and remember that regular exercise is essential for managing symptoms and maintaining overall health.

Breathability
Wearing lightweight and breathable clothing during exercise can optimise your comfort and maintain a more balanced body temperature. This can be particularly beneficial during menopause when hot flushes may be more frequent and intense.
Remember to choose clothing made from moisture-wicking materials, such as polyester blends or technical fabrics, and consider layering your clothing to easily adjust your body temperature as needed.

Underwear
Made from fast-drying, non-absorbent synthetic materials, these undies are designed to manage moisture by moving perspiration away during exercise. By keeping moisture away from your skin, these fabrics create an environment less conducive to bacterial growth, helping minimise unpleasant odours.
Some brands to check out: lululemon.co.uk, wuka.co.uk,
juliemay.co.uk

Workout wear
Moisture-wicking fabrics also keep your skin dry, minimising friction between your skin and the fabric. This reduces the likelihood of chafing and irritation, a common source of discomfort during a workout. Have a browse at:
decathlon.co.uk/women/activewear, adidas.co.uk, sweatybetty.com

Up the water
Staying well-hydrated is essential for dealing with menopausal hot flushes. Women experiencing these flushes can sweat profusely, leading to dehydration. Consistently consuming cool water or herbal drinks will help cool you down, recover and optimise your overall health. Making sure you stay well-hydrated is really important when it comes to managing menopausal hot flushes.

My tried, tested and regularly used emergency tips: 

  1. Take a towel to the gym/class, soak it in cold water, and, when needed, put it around your neck or – better still – on your head (it depends on where you are and if you have no shame – like me!).
  2. Decant water into a small spray bottle and spritz it on your face as needed.
  3. Green-tinted moisturiser balances out the redness. Rosalique has a great product: rosalique.co.uk/products/rosalique-3-in-1-anti-redness-miracle-formula.

Exercising during menopause and dealing with hot flushes can be challenging. Listen to your body and adapt exercise as necessary. Be aware of environmental conditions and work out at a cooler time of day, or opt for gym equipment near the air conditioning unit!

Sarah Maxwell is a multi-award winning Lifestyle Wellbeing and Fitness coach. You can find her at sarahmaxwell.com
Get in touch via email at sarahmaxwell@mail.com
and on social
@sarahmaxlife

Nourish to Flourish

Nutrition & Lifestyle Coach Charlotte Lau explores the benefits of incorporating another healthy ingredient into our diets. This month it’s cherries One of my personal favourites… English cherry season. This small, but delicious, stone fruit doesn’t last long, so make...

Take me to… a UK Staycation

We’re kicking off our new travel feature with a collection of ideas to get you trying something new with explorative and adventurous trips Cornish Escape The Park, Cornwall is an award-winning holiday village, just a short stroll from Mawgan Porth...

Brain power!

Sarah Maxwell explores how exercise affects your grey matter Exercise has long been recognised for its positive impact on physical health. However, many recent studies have shown that exercise also has many transformative effects on the brain, so if you...